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ERIE LACKAWANNA
EASTBOUND FREIGHT SYMBOLS
SYMBOL FROM / TO / WHEN NOTES

A-BH-4

Buffalo to Hoboken via SC, 1960 - 1961.

Advance Buffalo Hoboken 4. Advance section of BH-4, miscellaneous traffic from Buffalo connections. This train was a hold-over from the DL&W freight schedule, and was gone by 1962.

ADV - 100 or ANY - 100

Chicago to Maybrook and Croxton via PO, 1968; then in 1969, Chicago to Croxton once per week for several months (special train for refrigerated meat traffic).

Advance 100. Advance section of NY-100, TOFC train from Chicago to Croxton. In the 1969 fast freight schedule, ANY-100 was programmed as an early evening departure from Chicago, and handled Maybrook traffic in lieu of NE-100, which was temporarily cut back to Binghampton (D&H interchange). This schedule was probably added to capture traffic being lost by the Penn Central due to their merger problems. In 1969, ADV-100 ran once per week, Saturday PM out of Chicago, direct to Croxton. According to a former EL dispatcher, ADV-100 carried mostly refrigerated trailers loaded with meat products, and was thus nicknamed "the kielbasa special".

ANE - 74

Chicago to Maybrook, early post-merger to 1963.

Advance New England 74. Advance section of NE-74, manifest freight from Chicago to New England connections at Binghamton and Maybrook.

ANY - 74

Marion to Croxton, early post-merger to 1963.

Advance New York 74. Advance section of NY-74, manifest freight from Chicago to New York terminals. In 1962, ANY-74 was considered a "market train" for perishibles heading for the 7 am New York Pier Auction

AP – 2

Buffalo to Croxton via PO, mid-1970 to mid–1972.

Apollo 2. TOFC / mixed manifest. This schedule was probably an effort by the EL to compete with the LV for TOFC traffic from parent N&W’s hot Apollo service out of Chicago (via former NKP). Although the symbol appeared in EL schedules until 1972, AP-2 ran regularly for only about 6 months in 1970, then ran occasionally as a non-TOFC overflow train on a loose schedule in 1971. (LV’s Apollo service obviously won the battle as the N&W’s primary TOFC connection to the NY area). W/B counterpart, AP – 1.

ATC – 2

Buffalo to Scranton, late-1969 to mid-1972.

Advance Transcontinental 2. Mixed manifest. TC symbols were part of Dereco / N&W coordination efforts, but this service was probably just a renaming of the former NE – 2.

ATC – 4

Buffalo to Scranton, early-1969 to late-1969; Buffalo to Binghamton, late-1969 to at least 1974, possibly later.

Advance Transcontinental 4. Mixed manifest. TC symbols were part of Dereco / N&W coordination efforts. ATC-4 was considered a run-through to the D&H for Mechanicsville, often had D&H power. Probably replaced NE – 4.

AY - 78

Susquehanna PA to Ashley PA (CNJ yard), 1960-1961.

AshleY - 78, a former Erie symbol, carrying interchange from connecting freights at Susquehanna, PA (primarily 78) to interchange with the CNJ. Ran via the Jefferson Division to Avoca, then D&H and CNJ to Ashley. This operation was obviously redundant with the ex-DL&W interchange arrangement via Scranton and Taylor, PA, and was one of the first former Erie operations to be eliminated. It is surprising that the train (and its westbound conterpart AY-91) still appeared in the 1961 schedules.

B - 98

Marion to Binghamton, 1961.

Binghamton - 98, connecting from CO-98 at Marion, scheduled for a relatively fast run to Binghamton (14 hrs 45 min, slightly faster than 100). Made a 15-minute connection at Binghamton to BU-19 (to Utica) and BS-21 (to Syracuse). Appears to be an attempt by early EL management to guarantee 2nd morning delivery from Chicago to Utica and Syracuse via the Erie route from Chicago, as to take business from a similar NKP - DL&W schedule (CN - 8 to 20 to S&U trains). Does not appear in 1962 schedule.

BA – 100

Gang Mills to Binghamton, early 1971 to late 1972.

Binghamton (?) Albany (?) 100. Mixed manifest. Possibly a D&H coordination service during Dereco era, gathering set-outs from night e/b’s at Gang Mills, esp. PN-98?, so as to avoid set-out congestion at Binghamton. Previously was DH – 100, although during June-July 1972 Hurricane Agnes detour movements, DH - 100 symbol was used in lieu of BA - 100.

BA – 2

Buffalo to Scranton, April 1969.

Possibly a misprint in the April, 1969 schedule, as freight BS – 2 does not appear. Not sure if a "BA-2" ever actually operated.

BC – 2

Buffalo to Croxton via PO, mid-1972 to 1973; Buffalo to Croxton via SC, mid-1973 to 1976.

Buffalo Croxton 2. Mixed manifest. Replaced TC – 2 symbol as EL – N&W cooperation was waning after Hurricane Agnes and bankruptcy. Generally ran daily, one of EL’s more reliable operations.

BH – 2

Buffalo to Scranton, early post-merger to mid-1965.

Buffalo – Hoboken 2, mixed manifest, a DL&W holdover symbol even though eastern terminus was Scranton. Possibly became BS – 2, a somewhat more accurate designation.

BH – 4

Buffalo to Hoboken, 1960 to 1961; Buffalo to Croxton via Hornell and Scranton, 1962 to 1963, via Port Jervis 1964 to early 1967; Buffalo to Maybrook and Croxton via PO, 1967 - 68.

Buffalo – Hoboken 4, mixed manifest, a DL&W holdover symbol. Connected to L&HR 30 to Maybrook, thence NH OB-6 to Boston until early 1962 (EL sought to discourage this routing in favor of the ex-Erie routing direct from Maybrook; the NE - 4 / L&HR 32 connection was discontinued about a year after the BH - 4 / L&HR 30 connection). By mid-1962, BH-4 was shifted to ex-Erie Buffalo line via Hornell, and eastern terminus was moved from Hoboken to Croxton. Moved to Port Jervis route in 1964. Maybrook stop was added to schedule in 1967. Possibly replaced by TC–2 or TC-4.

BH - 6

Buffalo to Scranton, 1962 - 1963.

Buffalo - Hoboken 6, mixed manifest, a DL&W heritage symbol even though running via Hornell and cut back to Scranton. Probably replaced NE-6 in 1962 and in turn was replaced by BS-6 in 1964.

BH - 8

Buffalo to Hoboken, 1960 to 1961; Buffalo to Scranton, 1962.

Buffalo - Hoboken 8, mixed traffic, a DL&W holdover symbol even though terminal was cut back to Scranton in 1962, then abolished. Picked up Scranton traffic from NY-98 in Hornell in 1962.

BH – 12

Binghamton to Port Morris via SC, early post-merger; then Binghamton to Croxton, 1964 to mid-1966.

Binghamton – Hoboken 12, a DL&W holdover symbol, even though Croxton was the eastern terminus. Was obviously a continuation of NE–2 from Buffalo to Binghamton. Evidence indicates that the NE–2 symbol was usually used into Croxton, and that BH – 12 was mostly a "paper-only" train on the EL. In 1962, BH-12 was scheduled to run via Old Road from Slateford Jct., PA to Port Morris, NJ (NE-2 was known to operate this route). Power may have tied up at Port Morris and used on HB-9 next day, through 1963; from 1964 to 1966, NE-2 regularly ran through to Croxton.

BH – 78

Marion to Meadville, 1975 - 1976

Brier Hill 78. See notes for symbol 78, below.

BM – 74

Brier Hill to Meadville, early 1971 to mid 1972.

Brier Hill – Meadville 74. Short-lived attempt at an eastbound manifest schedule out of the Youngstown area.

BN - 74

Chicago to Huntington ? Circa 1969 to 1970

Burlington Northern 74. Mixed manifest, including reefers. See also CBQ-74. In 1969, EL established a power pool with the CBQ and later the BN, usually via NE-74 out of Chicago. However, it is possible that a separate BN-74 section ran on the Marion Div., from the BN connection in Chicago to Huntington or Marion, thence combining with NE-74 out of the EL’s Chicago yards. BN power operated from Chicago area to Marion at this time, occasionally running through to Croxton. BN-74 did not appear in schedules, but employee timetables referred to it in the 50 MPH freight speed authority statements. Primary connections in Chicago were from CBQ/BN trains 64 from Denver and 68 from Kansas City.

BR – 100

Meadville to Buffalo, late 1973 to 1974, possibly 1975.

Buffalo / Rochester 100. This symbol was a renaming of the Meadville to Buffalo component of RC-98, although the Buffalo to Rochester component of the run retained the RC-98 symbol. This was arguably an effort by the EL sales department to market 2nd-morning TOFC service from Chicago to Buffalo and Rochester (via NY100 to Meadville). Did not amount to an actual service improvement, schedules were same as before.

BRC - 98

Chicago to Marion, 1975 to 1976.

Belt Railway Chicago 98. Replaced NY - 98 and PN - 98 from Chicago to Marion, connected to NY-98 and PO-98 at Marion. Originated at BRC Clearing Yard, implementing Chicago-area run-through service from connecting roads for eastbound traffic (in lieu of e/b interchange via EL's 51st St. Yard, or before 1972, via 51st St., BRC at 87th St., and Hammond. Ran the approxmiate schedule of NY-98 from Chicago, close behind NY-100.

BS – 2

Buffalo to Scranton, 1966 to 1968; Buffalo to Scranton, late 1972; Buffalo to Binghamton, 1973 to 1975, possibly into 1976.

Buffalo – Scranton 2. Mixed manifest. This schedule was dropped in 1968 but revised in 1972, replacing ATC-2 (as Dereco / N&W cooperation declined after bankruptcy). Schedule was cut back to Binghamton in 1973, but BS designation was retained. May have still operated to Scranton as needed.

BS – 4

Buffalo to Scranton, mid-1972 to 1975, possibly into 1976.

Buffalo – Scranton 4. Mixed manifest. May have been the former TCS-4, as Dereco/N&W symbols were being de-emphasized after 1972 bankruptcy.

BS – 6

Buffalo to Scranton, 1964 to 1968.

Buffalo – Scranton 6. Possibly became the TCS-4 during early Dereco/N&W cooperation era.

BX - 78

Buffalo to Hornell, 1960 - 1961 and 1963.

Buffalo - 78. Connected to train 78 at Hornell with miscellaneous low-priority traffic. Not in 1962 schedule, but reappeared in 1963 schedule providing Buffalo connection to A-NE-74 to Maybrook.

CB – 2

Port Jervis to Maybrook, 1969 to 1974

Chicago – Boston (?) 2. (Might also refer to former NH "Cannonball" TOFC service to Boston). This run connected to a former New Haven train out of Maybrook using the same name. Replaced the former NE-98 and NE-100 hotshot service from Chicago to Maybrook, as Maybrook traffic declined after PC took NH over. Usually a short train, collected set outs from fast eastbounds through Port Jervis as to connect to NH / PC CB-2 from Maybrook to Boston. CB-2’s crew next did some local work, then met the (PC) NE-97 at Maybrook and took that train back to Port Jervis. Power would stay at Maybrook or Campbell Hall until NE-74 arrived in the afternoon; after the EL NE-74 train was handed to PC at Maybrook, that crew could use CB-2 units to either go back to Port or run to Croxton, depending on where power and crews were needed.

CBQ – 74

Chicago to Huntington ? circa 1967 to 1969

Chicago Burlington Quincy 74. Mixed manitest, including reefers. See also BN-74. In 1969, EL established a power pool with the CBQ and later the BN, usually via NE-74 out of Chicago. However, it is possible that a separate CBQ-74 ran on the Marion Div. from the CBQ connection in Chicago to Huntington or Marion, thence combining with NE-74 out of EL’s Chicago yards. CBQ / BN power operated from Chicago area to Marion about this time, occasionally running thru to Croxton. CBQ-74 did not appear in schedules, but was referred to in 50 MPH freight speed authority statements in employees timetables. Primary connections in Chicago were from CBQ/BN trains 64 from Denver and 68 from Kansas City. W/B counterpart, Q-99.

CM – 2

Cleveland to Meadville via Y’Town, mid-1966 to 1975, possibly 1976.

Cleveland – Meadville 2. Mixed manifest. Replaced 192 symbol as part of the William White revision of EL freight service in 1965-66.

CO - 74

Chicago to Marion, early post-merger to 1963.

ChicagO (or COmbined) 74. Mixed manifest. At Marion, this train was split into NY-74, ANY-74 (Croxton), and NE-74 (Maybrook). Appears to represent early EL tonnage philosophy under Operations VP Gary White.

CO - 78

Chicago to Marion, 1975 - 1976.

ChicagO 78. Road local. See 78.

CO – 98

Chicago to Marion, early post-merger to 1965.

ChicagO (or COmbined) 98. Mixed manifest. At Marion, this train was split into NY-98 (Croxton), NE-98 (Maybrook), and WJ-98 (Port Jervis); and for a short time in 1961, B-98 to Binghamton. Appears to represent early EL tonnage philosophy under Operations VP Gary White; during William White revisions in 65-66, NY-98 and NE-98 originated in Chicago, while WJ-98 was reprogrammed as PN-98 to Scranton, which was extended to originate in Chicago.

DH – 100

Gang Mills to Binghamton, mid-1969 to 1970.

Delaware Hudson 100. Mixed manifest. Possibly a D&H coordination service during Dereco era, gathering set-outs from night e/b’s at Gang Mills, esp. PN-98?, so as to avoid set-out congestion at Binghamton. Became BA – 100 in 1971 freight schedules, although during Hurricane Agnes detour movements in June-July 1972, DH - 100 symbol was used in lieu of BA-100.

DM – 98

Dayton to Marion, 1969 to 1975, possibly 1976.

Dayton – Marion 98, daily mixed manifest freight from Dayton. Replaced the DN – 98 symbol in 1968, possibly to avoid confusion with DN-90 symbol instituted at about that time.

DN – 90

Buffalo to Mahwah and Croxton via PO, 1969 to 1974.

Detroit - New York 90. Autoparts traffic, primarily. Replaced the 90 symbol during the early Dereco era, citing connection from N&W train with same name on former Wabash Canada Div from Detroit to Buffalo. This train’s primary mission was autoparts traffic from the Detroit area to the Ford plant in Mahwah, NJ. Although schedules called for DN-90 to continue to Croxton, it sometimes turned and went back to Port Jervis after delivering auto traffic. Croxton traffic from Buffalo would generally go on TC-2 (later BC-2). Stopped operating during 1974 recession, Ford auto parts traffic diverted to TC-4.

DN – 98

Dayton to Marion, early post-merger to 1969

DaytoN 98, daily mixed freight from Dayton. Replaced by DM-98, possibly to avoid confusion with DN-90.

EL – 2

Huntington to Marion, early 1974 to possibly 1975

Erie Lackawanna 2. Connection traffic from N&W out of St. Louis in Huntington, formerly handled in NYCB and ECE. W/B counterpart was NW-1.

ECE

Huntington to Croxton, 1970 to 1972.

East Coast Expediter. (Sometimes nicknamed the "East Coast Exterminator"). Mixed manifest. Was part of Dereco / N&W service coordination, meant to expedite traffic from KC and StL to the EL. Cannonball service operated at same time via the same route, but represented "premium" service, whereas ECE was "regular" mixed traffic. W/B counterpart, WCE. Ended around time of EL bankruptcy after Hurricane Agnes.

FB - 4

Marion to Harding, OH, circa 1972.

Fisher Body 4. Auto parts traffic between C&O interchange in Marion and Fisher Body plant in Ontario, OH, near Harding Yard. W/b counterpart, FB-5.

HD – 100

Hammond to Maybrook and Croxton via Port Jervis, early 1968. Hammond to Port Jervis, 1969.

HammonD 100. Mixed manifest. Combined with TC-6 at Port Jervis for Croxton, per 1969 schedule. Operated through to Croxton occasionally. Represents EL service improvement during Penn Central post-merger service collapse, to handle traffic from Chicago area connections diverted from PC routes. Possibly replaced by SFE-100 and RI-100.

HF – 98

Meadville to Port Jervis, approx. 1969 to 1974; Chicago 51st St. to Meadville, 1975 to 1976.

Meadville 98 (call letters for Meadville Yard are HF). Road local, doing much set-out / pick-up work from Meadville to Port Jervis. Generally did not appear in EL through freight schedules. After 1974, ran from 51st St. yard in Chicago to Meadville with CNW and BN eastbound interchange cars, may have combined at times with IC96 at Huntington. This train thus had higher importance than the previous HF-98. Interchange traffic from Chicago made connections to NY-98, PN-98 and PO-98 at Meadville.

IC - 96, aka ICG - 96

Chicago to Marion, 1975.

Illinois Central (Gulf) 96. Mixed manifest. By early 1975 the EL began originating several e/b freights, including this run from the ICG Fordham Yard, to Marion from off-line Chicago yards in lieu of using the EL's 51st Street Yard for all e/b interchange (and prior to 1972, using 51st St., 87th St., and Hammond Yards). Possibly combined at Huntington with MILW - 98 or BRC - 98.

LI - 98

Port Jervis to Croxton, circa 1962.

Long Island 98. Connection from NE-98 at Port Jervis, cars for LIRR and terminal lines in Brooklyn via carfloat, and New York area meat.

M - 76, aka MILW - 76

Chicago to Marion, 1975 to 1976.

Milwaukee 76. Mixed manifest. Originated in CM&STP yard, run via IHB to EL at Calumet City, connection at Marion to NY - 98 and PO - 98, possibly PN - 98 also. Ran on previous PN-98 schedule out of Chicago, approximately. Was previously called M - 98 (or MILW - 98).

M - 98, aka MILW - 98

Chicago to Marion, 1975.

Milwaukee 98. Mixed manifest. See M - 76 above. By early 1975 the EL began originating several e/b freights, including this run from the CM&STP, to Marion from off-line Chicago yards in lieu of using the EL's 51st Street Yard for all e/b interchange (and prior to 1972, using 51st St., 87th St., and Hammond Yards). Originated at MILW Galewood or Bensenville Yd., ran via IHB to EL at Calumet City near State Line Tower.

M - 100

See RI – 100.

Milwaukee 100. Mixed manifest. According to schedule, had same times (and thus was generally combined with) RI-100. However, separate M – 100 trains did run through to Croxton on several occasions, during 1968-69 traffic surge due to PC merger problems.

MF – 74

Meadville to Buffalo, 1966 to 1968; Marion to Buffalo, 1969 to 1972; Chicago to Buffalo, 1973 to 1974. Marion or Meadville to Buffalo, 1975 to 1976.

The "M" could stand for Meadville or Marion. The F could stand for BuFfalo? Obviously this train had colorful nicknames (including "Mighty Fine"). Mixed manifest, probably protected a Buffalo connection from NE-74 service at Meadville (SFE-100 or occasionally NE/MW-74 in 1975-76). MF-74 was a heavier tonnage train that mostly ran via the River Line and the wye at River Jct. to the Buffalo Main.

MF – 78

Meadville to Buffalo, 1960 to 1965.

As with MF-74, which appears to have succeeded MF-78, the F is uncertain, possibly BuFfalo. Mixed traffic connection to Buffalo from 78, later NE-74 and NY-74.

MW – 74

Marion to Port Jervis, late 1975 to 1976.

MahWah - 74. This train was established during the EL's final months, to carry blocks from Marion for Meadville, for Binghamton / D&H, locals from Binghamton to Port Jervis (formerly handled by the HF-98 road local, and for a short time by PO-98), and Mahwah Ford cars from Chicago, Lima, Marion and Akron. The Mahwah cars usually were picked up in Port Jervis by the PO-98, which set them off at Suffern NY and proceeded to Croxton Yard.

N - 78

Huntington to Marion, 1975 to 1976

"N" was EL’s call letter for Huntington Yard (tower was WR). Carried eastbound traffic from the N&W from St. Louis. Replaced EL-2.

N – 98

Huntington to Marion, late 1966 to 1968

"N" was EL’s call letter for Huntington Yard (tower was WR); may also have referred to the N&W traffic connection. This train appears to be a William White era service improvement for traffic off the Wabash / N&W from St. Louis.

NE – 2

Buffalo to Binghamton, early post-merger EL to 1966; Buffalo to Scranton, 1967 to 1968.

New England 2, a former DL&W symbol for a mixed manifest with New England traffic via the D&H and L&HR. As used after the merger, NE-2 ran to Binghamton, and according to schedule took on the symbol BH-12 to Port Morris (later Croxton), making set outs and pickups along the way. However, it appears that the NE-2 symbol was still in use on the New York Division up to 1966, in lieu of BH-12. As such, NE-2 ran via Old Road from Slateford to Port Morris up to 1963, thereafter via Blairstown Cut Off and through to Croxton.

NE – 4

Buffalo to Hoboken, 1960 to 1961; Buffalo to Croxton via Hornell and Scranton, 1962 to 1963; Buffalo to Maybrook and Croxton via PO, 1964 to 1966; Buffalo to Binghamton, 1966 to 1968.

New England 4, a former DL&W symbol for a mixed manifest with New England traffic via the D&H and L&HR. Connected to L&HR 32 at Port Morris for New Haven train OB-2 to Boston. Moved to Erie Buffalo Line via Hornell in 1962; also, eastern terminal was moved from Hoboken to Croxton. However, still ran in 1962 via Scranton, making connection to L&HR for Maybrook (L&HR 32's connection from BH-4 was discontinued by early 1962). After 1963, NE-4 was diverted to the Erie side via Port Jervis, with Maybrook traffic going there directly (eliminating the L&HR from Port Morris, to maximize EL revenues; it is interesting that the EL took more than 2 years to get shippers to agree to that). The schedule was reprogrammed to Binghamton in 1966. It appears to have been replaced by ATC-4 in 1969.

NE – 6

Buffalo to Scranton, 1960 - 1961; Buffalo to Maybrook and Croxton via PO, 1966 to 1968.

New England 6, a former DL&W-like symbol. Initially was a livestock / perishable / TOFC train to Binghamton and Scranton, probably replaced by BH - 6 in 1962. Symbol was brought back in 1966 as a train with traffic for New England. In this re-incarnation, the train appears to be a service improvement in the William White years, taking the place of NE-4 while allowing that train to exclusively serve the D&H connection at Binghamton. Probably replaced by TC-4.

NE – 74

Chicago to Maybrook, early post-merger to mid-1967; Chicago to Maybrook and Croxton, 1967 to 1971; Chicago to Maybrook, 1972 to 1974; Chicago to Utica, 1974 to 1975; Gang Mills to Utica, 1975; Chicago to Binghamton, late 1975; Chicago to Marion, 1976.

New England 74, traditional Erie hotshot to Maybrook, with mixed traffic including reefer perishables (re-icing in Marion). Sometimes ran to Croxton after Maybrook delivery. Prior to 1950, most Erie perishible traffic from the west coast was handled by NY-98. Diesels speeded up schedules between California and Chicago by about 12 hours, such that some perishibles could be handled by 74, which departed Chicago in mid-morning vs. NY98's early evening departure. Primary connections in Chicago were from CBQ/BN trains 64 from Denver and 68 from Kansas City; ran with pooled EL-CBQ/BN power in early 70's (see BN-74, CBQ-74). In 1973, when perishible traffic was practically gone, NE-74 became a run-thru / power pool train with the PC east of Port Jervis, to New Haven, CT (via the former Maybrook interchange). After the Poughkeepsie Bridge fire in 1974, the train was diverted to Utica with a PC – EL power pool between Binghamton and Selkirk. In 1974 - 1975, NE-74 originated in Gang Mills with set-outs from other freights; EL obviously did not want to use its scarce cash flow to maintain high quality service for PC traffic. This symbol was soon changed to UT-74. In late 1975, during a time of rapidly changing operating patterns due to traffic declines and rebounds, the NE-74 symbol was restored out of Chicago with traffic for the PC (set out at Gang Mills for the UT-74 to Utica and Selkirk Yard on the PC) and for the D&H at Binghamton, along with Ford autoparts traffic for Mahwah, NJ. By December, 1975, the NE - 74 ran east of Marion as the MW - 74.

NE – 98

Marion to Maybrook, early post-merger; Chicago to Maybrook, 1964 to 1969.

New England 98, traditional Erie manifest to Maybrook, with mixed traffic including reefers. Service ended in 1969 with PC merger and takeover of New Haven, degrading the Maybrook gateway.

NE – 100

Chicago to Maybrook, 1966 to 1967; Chicago to Maybrook and Croxton, 1967 to 1968; Chicago to Binghampton, 1968; Binghamton to Lake Jct. (thence CNJ to Port Newark), mid to late-1973.

New England 100, service improvement from William White era to speed TOFC and boxcar manifest traffic to Boston via NH freight CB-2 for 10 AM arrival in Boston; also to D&H train PB-1 (to Mechanicsville, NY and then B&M train PB-2 for 10 AM Boston arrival), via Binghamton set-out. NE-100 cut back to Binghampton in 1968 fast freight schedules, and then ended after PC merger and takeover of NH, replaced by low priority CB-2 service from Port Jervis to Maybrook and then Cedar Hill CT via PC, and PB-100 TOFC service to Binghamton for D&H / B&M. Before NE-100 was established, TOFC traffic was brought to Maybrook by 100. Doubtful that NE-100 regularly ran to Croxton as in the 1967-1968 program; under that program, NY-100 was to carry Binghampton TOFC/high class traffic, with NE-100 comprised of New Haven and New York Terminal traffic. The second incarnation of NE-100 came in 1973 as a run-through EL / CNJ train via the CNJ High Bridge Branch, akin to the SE-98. This version of NE-100 was a TOFC train that connected from the PB-100 in Binghamton, offering expedited service from Chicago to the CNJ’s Portside TOFC terminal in Port Newark. Traffic failed to develop and the train was discontinued by late 1973 (oil crisis and recession). W/B counterpart (in both incarnations), NE-99.

NF-2, NF-4

Niagara Falls to Buffalo, early 60s to 1976

Niagara Falls to Buffalo, NY. Interchange from Canadian roads at Suspension Bridge, NY. Both had timetable authority, as trains 284 and 272. NF-4 informally called "Day Falls Run", NF-2 called "Night Falls Run"; also variously called "Falls Turns" or "Falls Jobs". Westbound counterparts, NF-1, NF-3.

NP – 18

Scranton to Rupert, late 1969

Newberry Jct to Philadelphia 18 (Reading train symbol). Shown in Oct. 1969 schedule. Connection to Reading at Rupert with eastbound traffic for Philadelphia from PN-98, to replace RDG-98 operation via Newberry Jct. (Somewhat confusing, because this symbol reflects eastbound direction of traffic from Chicago to Philadelphia, although operation between Scranton and Rupert is considered westbound by timetable authority.) Because of the PC merger, RDG eliminated manifest service to Newberry and was thus willing to short-haul itself by interchanging with the EL in Rupert. Not sure if an NP-18 actually operated on EL Bloomsbury line as a distinct train, or if the schedule entry just represented service to Rupert via the 241 (aka 1737, later 1741 after 1972) freight from Scranton to Northumberland. The Oct. 1973 schedule indicates that the 1741 left Scranton mid-day for Northumberland and brought traffic from PN-98 for connection with RDG NP-18 to Philadelphia.

NY – 74

Chicago to Maybrook and Croxton, early post-merger to 1966; Chicago to Croxton, 1968; Port Jervis to Croxton, 1972 to 1973; Marion to Croxton via Scranton, 1973 to 1974.

New York 74. Mixed manifest. Supplemental service to NE-74, depending upon traffic levels. Connected from NE-74 at Port Jervis for Croxton in 1972. Connected from NE-74 at Marion for Croxton via Scranton in 1973-74, replaced by SFE-100.

NY – 98

Marion to Croxton via PO, early post-merger to 1964; Marion to Croxton via SC or PO, 1965 (usually via SC); Chicago to Croxton via SC, 1966; Chicago to Croxton via PO, 1967; Chicago to Croxton via PO, 1972; Chicago to Croxton via SC, 1973 to 1974; Marion to Croxton via SC, 1975 to 1976.

New York 98. Traditional Erie perishible freight manifest from Chicago to Croxton. Would start in Chicago or Marion (from COmbined 98 connection from Chicago to Marion). In 1962, NY-98 was considered a "market train" for perishibles heading for the 10 pm and 1 am New York Pier Markets. After 1963, could run to Croxton via Port Jervis or Scranton as suited operating needs (no longer termed a "market train", with perishible traffic declining). Disappeared during Dereco era, brought back in 1973 perhaps as a statement of (or desire for) renewed EL independence from N&W after the Hurricane Agnes bankruptcy. Connected from BRC-98 and MILW-76 at Marion in 1975 - 1976.

NY – 100

Chicago to Croxton via PO 1966 to 1973; Chicago to Croxton via Scranton, 1973 to 1976.

New York 100. Traditional Erie TOFC / boxcar forwarder hotshot from Chicago to Croxton. Officially nicknamed "The Flying Saucer" along with W/B counterpart NY-99 by the Erie. Prior to 1966, was called "100" and made Maybrook delivery. In 1970s, carried fewer and fewer forwarder boxcars and more and more UPS trailers. According to a former EL employee, NY-100 sometimes carried trailers of Kosher meat, requiring an on-call rabbi to bless the trailers during the crew change at Meadville. For a brief time in 1967, was programmed to set out priority freight for the D&H at Binghampton, allowing NE-100 to run through Binghampton non-stop. NY-100 also usually set out priority freight for Buffalo and Rochester in Meadville, connecting to RC-98.

2-NY-100

Chicago to Croxton via PO, 1970 to 1976.

Second New York 100. TOFC only. Started in 1970, when the EL gained a lucrative TOFC contract with UPS. Ran almost exclusively with UPS trailers.

NYCB

Huntington to Croxton via PO, 1970 to 1972. Huntington to Croxton via SC, 1973.

New York Cannon Ball. TOFC and boxcar merchandise. Run-thru service with N&W from St. Louis to Croxton. N&W power pool during initial 2 years. EL tried to continue this service after bankruptcy, switched it to the Scranton side in early 1973. However, the NYCB ended by late 1973 (because of the oil crisis and recession). W/B counterpart, SLCB.

NS - 98

Lima to Marion, 1960 - 1961.

NS - 98. Traffic from NKP (St. Louis line) to Marion, connecting to NY - 98 and NE - 98. Renamed SJ - 98 in 1962.

NS - 74

Lima to Marion, 1960 - 1961.

NS - 74. Traffic from NKP (St. Louis line) to Marion, connecting to NY - 74 and NE - 74. Renamed SJ - 74 in 1962.

PB – 100

Chicago to Binghamton, 1968 to 1976.

PiggyBack 100. TOFC service from Chicago to Boston via D&H from Binghamton / B&M from Mechanicsville. Some power pooling between three roads, EL units were seen in Boston, B&M units sometimes went west of Binghamton. Service started soon after PC merger, to attract Boston shippers having trouble with PC. TOFC traffic to D&H in Binghamton formerly handled by NE-100. After 1974, ran with mixed carload / TOFC due to discontinuation of TC-100.

PN – 98

Marion to Scranton, 1967; Marion to Scranton to Croxton, late 1967; Chicago to Scranton to Croxton, 1968 to 1972; Chicago to Scranton, 1973 to 1974; Marion to Scranton, 1975 – 1976.

Pennsylvania / New Jersey 98. Part boxcar manifest, part road local. Initiated during William White service restructuring, so as to improve service to Scranton area, CNJ connection, and ex-DLW points east of Scranton. Extended to Chicago during traffic surge from shippers fleeing PC merger problems. Ran from Scranton to Croxton as road local, that component renamed SC-8 in 1973. Cut back to Marion in final years, connecting from BRC-98.

PO – 74

Port Jervis to Croxton, 1973 to 1974.

POrt Jervis 74. Mixed manifest. Brought Croxton traffic seperated from NE-74 in Port Jervis. Succeeded NY-74 in this mission, when NY-74 was re-established as a Marion to Croxton run via Scranton. Ended when Poughkeepsie Bridge burned and NE-74 was diverted to Utica to connect with the PC.

PO – 98

Marion to Croxton via PO, approx. 1968 to 1974; Meadville to PO and Croxton, 1975 to 1976.

POrt Jervis 98. An overflow train that could run at any time and do road work at any yard. Started running about the time of the PC-related traffic surge in 1968. PO-98 would not every day, but prior to 1975, could also run in two or even three sections depending on traffic -- basically an "overflow" train. Did not appear in schedule until 1975. In autumn, 1975, PO - 98 was programmed to Port Jervis only, doing local work at Jefferson Jct. and Delaware Subdivision points previously done by HF-98. Still ran to Croxton then as needed. In early 1976, local work in New York State was assigned to the MW - 74, and the PO-98 ran again with blocks of loads for Croxton, often picking up Mahwah Ford cars from the MW-74 at Port Jervis for set-out at Suffern, NY.

Rambler - 100

Chicago to Croxton, approx. 1962 / 63.

Rambler 100. Unit trains of Rambler autos from Kenosha, Wis. TOFC arrangement using auto-carriers that were grounded in Croxton. Not in schedules, but ran intermittently with "100 authority". Several times per week at peak. Interchanged via IHB at Hammond.

RC – 98

Meadville to Rochester via Buffalo, early post-merger to 1972; Buffalo to Rochester, 1973 to 1975, possibly 1976.

RoChester 98. Mixed manifest. Daily train to Rochester, carried TOFC from NY-100 connection at Meadville. Meadville to Buffalo component renamed BR-100 in 1973, probably as marketing tactic, as schedules did not change. RC-98 was a lighter tonnage train and sometimes ran via the shorter but more heavily graded B&SW route into Buffalo, versus the River Line and River Jct. wye to the Buffalo Main.

RDG – 98

Hornell to Newberry Jct. and Susquehanna, PA, 1960 - 1963; Gang Mills to Newberry Jct., 1964 to 1969.

Reading 98. Mixed manifest. Traditional Erie interchange with Reading, via NYC trackage rights from Corning to Newberry. EL encouraged interchange with Reading via Rupert on the Bloomsburg Branch out of Scranton, as to eliminate NYC / PC trackage rights costs and possible PC operating problems. Uncertain and somewhat doubtful that this train operated much after PC merger in Feb. 1968, as RDG itself ended manifest service to Newberry Jct at that time. Connected from NY-98 and BS-2. From 1961 - 1963, schedule indicates times for Newberry Jct., and for Binghamton and Susquehanna, PA. The EL crew from Hornell probably dropped a block of cars for the Reading at Newberry at Gang Mills, along with two locos (usually GP7s), where an NYC crew boarded to take the train to Newberry. The EL crew then continued east with the remaining engines and cars to deliver at Elmira, Binghamton and Susquehanna.

RI – 100

Hammond to Meadville, mid 1968 to 1970; Chicago to Meadville, 1971 to early 1972.

Rock Island 100. Mixed manifest. Per schedule, combined with SFE-100 at Meadville. However, when traffic was heavy during PC traffic diversions in 1969 – 69, RI-100 sometimes operated through to Croxton, in rare instances with RI pool power.

S - 20

Buffalo to Hoboken, 1960 - 1961.

"Satellite" 20. See 20, below.

SC – 2

Scranton to Croxton, early post-merger to early 1967

Scranton Croxton 2. Road local, subsumed into overall PN-98 schedule in 1967.

SC – 8

Scranton to Croxton, 1973 to 1976.

Scranton Croxton 8. Road local, formerly PN-98 (Scranton to Croxton section; PN-98 continued as Chicago or Marion to Scranton to end of EL).

SE – 98

Scranton to Lake Junction, continuing on CNJ to Elizabethport, early 1972 to 1976.

Scranton Elizabethport 98. Mixed manifest. DL&W and later EL traditionally maintained a high-volume interchange with the CNJ at Taylor Yard in Scranton. However, the CNJ intended to abandon its operations in Pennsylvania in 1972. In anticipation of this, the CNJ upgraded its High Bridge Branch and arranged a crew and power pool arrangement with the EL via Lake Junction, so as to operate a thru interchange freight from Elizabethport, NJ to Scranton, PA. This operation was generally successful, lasted to Conrail takeover. W/B counterpart, ES-99.

SFE – 100

Chicago to Croxton via PO, mid-1968 to mid-1972. Chicago to Croxton via SC, late-1974 to 1976.

Santa FE 100. Mixed manifest. Represented coordinated service with ATSF from Chicago, initiated during PC post-merger service problems to attract traffic. Actually ran quite regularly. RI-100 generally combined into SFE-100. Second incarnation in 1974 via Scranton, representing another ATSF – EL joint marketing effort. Originated in ATSF Corwith Yard outside of Chicago, one of several e/b road trains originating in off-line yards in Chicago by early 1975. No W/B counterpart 1968-70; SFE-97 / 99 in 1971 - 1976.

SJ - 74

Lima to Marion, 1962 - 1963.

SJ (call for Lima) 74. Mixed manifest from NKP service from St. Louis line. Connected to ANY-74, NE-74, NY-74 at Marion. After N&W took over NKP and Wabash, it favored Wabash route from St. Louis thru Huntington, IN. SJ-74 thus abolished.

SJ - 98

Lima to Marion, 1962 - 1963.

SJ (call for Lima) 98. Mixed manifest from NKP service from St. Louis line. Connected to NE-98, NY-98 at Marion. After N&W takeover of NKP and Wabash, N&W favored Wabash route from St. Louis via Huntington, IN; SJ-98 thus abolished.

TC – 2

Buffalo to Croxton via PO, 1969 – 1972.

Transcontinental 2. Mixed manifest. Represented, at least in spirit, the Buffalo-NY component of joint UP-N&W "Transcon" service via Kansas City. Initiated soon after Dereco takeover of EL. Probably replaced BH-4.

TC – 4

Buffalo to Maybrook and Croxton via PO, 1969 to mid-1972; Buffalo to Croxton via PO, 1972 to 1973; Buffalo to Croxton via SC, 1973 to 1974; Buffalo to Port Jervis, 1974; Buffalo to Mahwah via Scranton and Croxton, 1975 to 1976.

Transcontinental 4. Mixed manifest. Represented, at least in spirit, the Buffalo-NY component of joint UP-N&W "Transcon" service via Kansas City. Initiated soon after Dereco takeover of EL. Probably replaced NE-6. Delivered to Maybrook until 1972 (after Hurricane Agnes, most Maybrook traffic was delivered via NE-74 run through, picking up any Buffalo–Maybrook traffic at Port Jervis). In 1973, TC-4 was scheduled via Scranton, although in fact still operated via Port Jervis about half the time. In 1974, was scheduled to terminate at Port Jervis, although probably still operated to Croxton as required. In 1975, when DN-90 was discontinued, Ford autoparts traffic was assigned to TC-4, with routing via Scranton (given that high/wide clearance projects on former DLW between Croxton and Binghamton were recently completed), then operating through Croxton Yard up to Suffern to deliver autoparts to Ford in Mahwah. This move took advantage of the "New Loop" installed on the east side of Croxton Yard, allowing a straight move from the Boonton line to the Bergen County line. However, TC-4 did still operate via Port Jervis at times in 1975 and 76.

TC – 6

Huntington to Croxton via PO, 1969 to 1970.

Transcontinental 6. Mixed manifest. This was a Dereco service innovation, allowing the EL to compete for eastbound N&W traffic out of St. Louis or Kansas City (including UP-N&W Transcontinental service) via Huntington, IN instead of Buffalo NY, thus allowing EL a greater revenue share. TC-6 possibly replaced N-98, and was itself replaced in 1970 by ECE and NY Cannonball service.

TC – 100

Marion to Binghamton, 1969 to 1970. Chicago to Binghamton, 1971 to 1974.

Transcontinental 100. This was a Dereco service innovation to speed manifest carload traffic to the D&H from western connections, especially the joint UP-N&W "Transcontinental" service via TC-6 to Marion, later ECE. TC-100 was extended to originate in Chicago by 1971. Traffic from TC-100 was combined into previously all-TOFC PB-100 by 1975, due to declining traffic levels. W/B counterpart was TC-99.

TCS – 4

Gang Mills to Scranton, late 1969; Buffalo to Scranton, 1970 to 1972.

Transcontinental Scranton 4. Mixed manifest. Arguably was a connection from an N&W "TC" train in Buffalo’s Bison Yard, with traffic for Gang Mills, Binghamton and Scranton. May have replaced BS-6.

UT - 74

Gang Mills to Utica, 1975 to 1976.

Utica 74, a connection from New England 74 service during the EL's last year. After the Poughkeepsie Bridge fire in 1974, NE-74 was diverted to Utica with a PC - EL power pool between Binghamton and Selkirk. In 1974 - 75, NE-74 originated in Gang Mills with set-outs from other freights. After NE-74 was restored as a Chicago-Binghampton run, UT-74, Utica 74 was started out of Gang Mills with traffic set-out from the renewed NE-74. Crew and power originated in Hornell, NY.

WJ – 98

Marion to Port Jervis, early post-merger to 1966.

(Not sure what WJ referred to here – probably not WJ Tower Ridgewood, as train was scheduled only to Port Jervis). Mixed manifest. Scheduled to Port Jervis only, but often ran east to Croxton doing work at most yards along the NY Division. Arguably was reprogrammed in 1967 to PN-98 and PO–98.

20

Buffalo to Croxton, early post-merger; Buffalo to Maybrook and Croxton, 1964 to 1967.

20 was the former DL&W’s hottest freight from Buffalo to Hoboken. Around 1960, during the excitement of the "space race", the DLW nick-named it "Satellite 20"; appears in 1961 EL schedule as "S-20". After the merger, it was one of the first ex-DL&W schedules programmed via Port Jervis for Croxton terminal. After 1963, a Maybrook stop was added. By 1965, this train hardly operated on its own, generally being combined with 90 out of Buffalo. In the mid-60s, the EL had 3 other Buffalo to Croxton schedules, 4 if you count NE-2 / BH-12. It became obvious that this was too many. 20 was the odd man out, despite remaining in the schedules to 1967.

62

Marion to Cleveland, 1967 to 1974, possibly later.

62, mixed manifest. This train represents a William White era service improvement, offering through service from Marion (and thus connections to Chicago) to Cleveland. W/B counterpart, 61. By late 1975, was usually combined out of Marion with 78 (BH - 78) to be set out at Levittsburg and forwarded to Cleveland by MC - 1.

76

Chicago to Marion, early post merger to 1963.

76, mixed manifest, pick up at Hammond, Griffith, Huntington.

78

Chicago to Croxton, 1960 - 1963; Chicago to Meadville via Youngstown, 1964 to 1970; Chicago to Brier Hill / Y’Town, 1971 to 1972; Chicago to Meadville via Y’Town, 1973 to 1976. Also called the HM - 78 and CO - 78 out of Chicago, BH - 78 out of Marion.

78, initially a lower-priority through freight from Chicago to the NY terminals, connecting to and from 178 at Marion, MF - 78 at Meadville, and BX - 78 at Hornell. Reprogrammed as a mixed road local from Chicago serving the Youngstown area. In the 70s, the symbol from Chicago to Marion was sometimes "HM-78", possibly Hammond - Meadville 78. In 1975 and 1976 sometimes called "CO - 78", i.e. Chicago 78, road local. Also sometimes termed "BH - 78" (Brier Hill yard in Youngstown) during the 1970s.

84

Buffalo to Hornell, 1960 - 1962.

84, Buffalo connection to NY-98 manifest at Hornell.

90

Buffalo to Croxton via PO, early post-merger to 1968.

90, mixed manifest and auto parts traffic for Ford Mahwah. Renamed DN-90 during Dereco era. Reportedly delivered stock cars to NYS&W at Passaic Jct. before such traffic was lost in mid-60s.

92

Marion to Ferrona via Y’Town, 1966 to 1967. Marion to Meadville via Y’Town, 1968 to 1974, possibly later.

92, mixed road local serving Kent and steel producing area around Youngstown.

94

Marion to Meadville, early post merger; via Y’Town, 1964 to 1968.

94, mixed road local serving Akron, Kent; after 1963, did work at Brier Hill.

100

Chicago to Maybrook and Croxton via PO, merger to 1966.

100, TOFC and forwarder boxcar traffic, hotshot from Chicago. Traditional Erie symbol, once officially nicknamed "The Flying Saucer". Became NY-100 with Maybrook delivery deleted in 1966. Had a fast 26:15 schedule that probably was not being maintained, as NY-100 time was lengthened to 27:30 hours in 1969 and 28:45 hours by 1974. Programmed to make a tight connection at Maybrook to NH OB-8 for mid-morning arrival in Boston.

156

Cleveland to Brier Hill, merger thru 1976.

156, road local and drag freight making several stops along the First Mahoning Subdivision, including North Randall, Levittsburg and Niles.

162

Cleveland to Kent, merger to 1962.

162, road freight with westbounds from Cleveland, used e/b symbol from direction on Cleveland Branch (this train reversed directions at Levittsburg, OH). Later succeeded by 61 to Marion, taking w/b symbol from direction on Main Line.

178

Marion to Meadville via Y’Town, 1960 to 1965.

178, road local serving Youngstown area, connecting from 78 until 1964. Possibly replaced by 92.

192

Cleveland to Meadville via Y’Town, early post-merger to 1965.

192, mixed manifest eastbound from Cleveland. Replaced by CM-2.

242

Northumberland to Scranton, ?? to 1976.

242, road local on Bloomsburg Branch. Train had timetable authority as train 1738, later as 1742. Ran as the eastbound leg of a one-crew turn job from Scranton-Northumberland and return until 1974, when it ran with one-way crews each way (prob. due to deteriorating track conditions). At times, this train carried out interchange of westbound Philadelphia to Chicago traffic for SC-99 from Reading Lines at Rupert, PA after Reading cut back service to Newberry Jct. following PC merger in 1968 (EL thus discontinued RDG-99 operation from Newberry); however, a Rupert - Scranton run specifically for RDG traffic appears to have operated at various other times after 1968, called 1740; see PN-21 listing under Westbound symbols.

274

Marion to Youngstown, early post-merger to 1965.

274, mixed manifest serving Kent, Youngstown area.

1202, 1402

Phillipsburg to Port Morris, 1966-1976

1202, later 1402, timetable authority for "PBurger" turn job from Phillipsburg, NJ to Port Morris, NJ, then return west to Phillipsburg as 1401, making connection to CS-9 and SC-8 at Port Morris. Some interchange traffic from LV and PC from Phillipsburg. Had previously run as turn job from Hoboken or Croxton to Phillipsburg using symbol HP-1 westbound, returning east to Croxton/Hoboken as "P'Burger".

1738, 1740, 1742

Bloomsburg Branch, Northumberland-Rupert-Scranton, early 60s-1976

Bloomsburg Branch operations, including interchange from PRR/PC at Northumberland and RDG at Rupert. See 242, above, and PN-21 under Westbound symbols.

1820

Utica to Binghamton, 1960 to 1961.

1820. Road local, S&U Branch. Provided connection to XC-91 to Chicago.

1822

Utica to Binghamton, 1960 to 1961.

1822. Road local, S&U Branch. Provided connection to late night westbounds such as HB-1, HB-3, 99. Replaced by UB-22.

SB – 24

Syracuse to Binghamton, merger to late 1973.

Syracuse Binghamton 24. Evening road local, S&U Branch. Provided connection to late night westbounds such as HB-3, ND-91, SC-99, SLCB. Replaced by SB-12.

SB - 50

Syracuse to Binghamton, merger to late 1973.

Syracuse Binghamton 50. Pre-dawn road local, S&U Branch. Provided connection to AM westbounds such as PB-1, PB-99, NY-97. Replaced by SB-14, then ST-14.

UB – 22

Utica to Binghamton, 1962 to late 1973.

Utica Binghamton 22. Evening road local, S&U Branch. Had previously been called 1822. Provided connection to late night westbounds such as HB-3, ND-91, SC-99, SLCB. Replaced by UB-18.

SB – 12

Syracuse to Binghamton, 1973 to 1976.

Syracuse Binghamton 12. Evening road local. In late 1973, the EL revised the long-standing schedule for the S&U Branch. However, SB-12 seemed to be nothing more than SB-24 with a new name. Timetable connection to PB-99, allowing second day TOFC service Syracuse - Chicago. No connections advertised for S&U westbound carload traffic at this time (1973 - 1976), reflecting EL's diminished commitment to manifest carload service, as w/b forwarder and high-value carload traffic had severly declined. The strategic focus was mainly on TOFC at this time.

SB - 14

Syracuse to Binghamton, late 1973 to 1974.

Syracuse Binghamton 14. Pre-dawn road local. In late 1973 and 1974, the EL revised the long-standing schedule for the S&U Branch. SB-14 ran on a pre-dawn schedule similar to predecessor SB-50. No connections advertised for this train, which would be mainly carload traffic. This reflects the EL's diminished commitment to manifest carload service, as w/b forwarder and high-value carload traffic had severly declined. The strategic focus was mainly on TOFC at this time (1973 - 1976).

ST – 14

Syracuse to Scranton / Taylor Yard, 1974 to 1976.

Syracuse Taylor 14. Morning road local. In late 1973 and 1974, the EL revised the long-standing schedule for the S&U Branch. ST-14 ran past Binghamton to Scranton on a later schedule (mid-morning) than predecessor SB-50. No connections advertised for this train, which would be mainly carload traffic. This reflects the EL's diminished commitment to manifest carload service, as w/b forwarder and high-value carload traffic had severly declined. The strategic focus was mainly on TOFC at this time (1973 - 1976).

UB – 18

Utica to Scranton, 1973 to 1976.

Utica Binghamton 18. Road local. In late 1973, the EL revised the long-standing schedule for the S&U Branch. However, UB-18 seemed to be nothing more than UB-22 with a new name and slightly later departure, running through Binghamton to Scranton. Timetable connection to PB-99, allowing second day TOFC service Utica - Chicago. No connections advertised for S&U westbound carload traffic at this time (1973 - 1976), reflecting EL's diminished commitment to w/b manifest carload service, as w/b forwarder and high-value carload traffic had severly declined. The strategic focus was mainly on TOFC at this time.

To paraphrase Rod Stewart, "Every symbol tells a story, don’t it . . ."